1109-83:

Squatting Europe Kollective, Squatting in Europe: Radical Spaces, Urban Struggles

1109-83:

Squatting Europe Kollective, Squatting in Europe: Radical Spaces, Urban Struggles

krigsmaskinen:

The latest short documentary in the Global Uprisings series explores ongoing resistance and self-organization in the midst of the crisis in Spain.

As social conditions continue to deteriorate across Spain, people have been turning to the streets and to each other to find solutions to the crisis. This film tells the story of the massive mobilization that saw millions of people converge on Madrid on March 22, 2014; the story of the proliferation of social centers, community gardens, self-organized food banks; and the story of large-scale housing occupations by and for families that have been evicted. The film pieces together many of the creative ways that people have been coping with crisis and asks what the future may hold for Spain.

Filmed and edited in March/April 2014, it is part of the Global Uprisings documentary series. View more at globaluprisings.org.

scream-of-thee-butterfly:

A german communist defies his killers a beg for mercy - Circa 1918

Forever reblog this badass! Fuck nazis!

scream-of-thee-butterfly:

A german communist defies his killers a beg for mercy - Circa 1918

Forever reblog this badass! Fuck nazis!

(via theredhammerandsickle)

(Source: lademencedetitus, via bedangeroustogether)

ardora:

“If someone asks, ‘But what in the end is a philosopher?’ I would say ‘A philosopher is a human being who fights in theory.’”
— Louis Althusser, “The Dialectic: Laws or Theses?”
Photo: Althusser marches at a protest during the May ‘68.

ardora:

“If someone asks, ‘But what in the end is a philosopher?’ I would say ‘A philosopher is a human being who fights in theory.’”

— Louis Althusser, “The Dialectic: Laws or Theses?

Photo: Althusser marches at a protest during the May ‘68.

(via 1109-83)

neuriot:

Situationist International

(via 1109-83)

invisiblestories:

The green line, Beirut (via)

magictransistor:

Max Ernst. Paris Dream. 1925.

magictransistor:

Max Ernst. Paris Dream. 1925.

(via vostok1)

Anti-austerity protest in Italy turns violent - Europe - Al Jazeera English

Renzi, who came to power in February, has put forward an ambitious economic reform programme which will see public spending reduced by $6.2bn dollars.

With the country’s unemployment rate reaching a record 13 percent in February, he says reforms are a “precondition for economic recovery”.

Speaking last week, Renzi said the changes were needed as “there are those who have taken much, too much over the years, and it is time they give some back”.

classwaru:

Claudia Bernardi: In the last year, there were several OCCUPATIONS OF THEATERS AND CINEMAS all over Italy. There is a kind of network of independent spaces for culture.
In the past year, there are two examples in Rome that are worth speaking about.  The first one is Nuovo Cinema Palazzo, a very old cinema, where the local government recently decided to build a casino there.  So, all the population organized—there are even comrades of ESC squatting there, and migrants and even residents of 70, 80 years old, migrants, several artists and care workers.  After one year of struggle, occupiers have been recognized as a ‘multitude’ by the same court—as a multitude of people resisting against the casino and as legitimate to take back the place. Now, there are several independent projects: theater, performances, children’s activities, a free room for study—libraries in La Sapienza are open for only three hours a day now, and they are going to be completely closed from September—language courses, spaces for migrants.
It’s really a heterogeneous space and we are creating knowledge about ‘what is an occupation of a cultural space?’  What does it mean to, not only defend culture and to resist the attacks of the government, but to create a new way of the production of culture?  That’s the main antidote to the attacks of the government.
The second one is Teatro Valle.  It’s the oldest theater in Rome, built in 1727.  It was going to be closed, so a group of artists decided to occupy it—developing a common way to build up a common constitution through a large process of definition of new norms to organize and manage the space, affirming theatre as an institution of the common. They are finding out a new way, inside and against the Italian law, to create new norms that legitimate the space as part of ‘commons’ To build up these open spaces, we had several debates to create that status with the lawyer, philosophers, journalists, and all the artists.  They wrote this statute that is free and available to be modified on the website, and after months, they are collecting all the advice from people and raising funds to create a foundation. They are producing law “from below” and, at the same time, they are creating anomalous norms that will be available for everybody.
[from "Contaminating the University, Creating Autonomous Knowledge: Occupied Social and Cultural Centers in Italy - an interview with Claudia Bernardi"]

classwaru:

Claudia Bernardi: In the last year, there were several OCCUPATIONS OF THEATERS AND CINEMAS all over Italy. There is a kind of network of independent spaces for culture.

In the past year, there are two examples in Rome that are worth speaking about.  The first one is Nuovo Cinema Palazzo, a very old cinema, where the local government recently decided to build a casino there.  So, all the population organized—there are even comrades of ESC squatting there, and migrants and even residents of 70, 80 years old, migrants, several artists and care workers.  After one year of struggle, occupiers have been recognized as a ‘multitude’ by the same court—as a multitude of people resisting against the casino and as legitimate to take back the place. Now, there are several independent projects: theater, performances, children’s activities, a free room for study—libraries in La Sapienza are open for only three hours a day now, and they are going to be completely closed from September—language courses, spaces for migrants.

It’s really a heterogeneous space and we are creating knowledge about ‘what is an occupation of a cultural space?’  What does it mean to, not only defend culture and to resist the attacks of the government, but to create a new way of the production of culture?  That’s the main antidote to the attacks of the government.

The second one is Teatro Valle.  It’s the oldest theater in Rome, built in 1727.  It was going to be closed, so a group of artists decided to occupy it—developing a common way to build up a common constitution through a large process of definition of new norms to organize and manage the space, affirming theatre as an institution of the common. They are finding out a new way, inside and against the Italian law, to create new norms that legitimate the space as part of ‘commons’ To build up these open spaces, we had several debates to create that status with the lawyer, philosophers, journalists, and all the artists.  They wrote this statute that is free and available to be modified on the website, and after months, they are collecting all the advice from people and raising funds to create a foundation. They are producing law “from below” and, at the same time, they are creating anomalous norms that will be available for everybody.

[from "Contaminating the University, Creating Autonomous Knowledge: Occupied Social and Cultural Centers in Italy - an interview with Claudia Bernardi"]

Visiting Rome, Forte Prenestino

Visiting Rome, San Lorenzo, via dei volsci 32

(Source: heroinbobantifa, via leftside1312)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

March 30: Land Day in Palestine

Land Day, or ‘Youm al-Ard’ in Arabic, commemorates the day in 1976, when Israeli Occupation forces opened fire on a group of Palestinians peacefully protesting the confiscation and closure of 5,500 acres of land from villages in the Galilee. That day, Khair Mohammad Yasin, Raja Husein Abu Ria, Khader Abd Khalaileh, Khadijeh Shawahneh, Mohammad Yousef Taha, and Rafat Al Zuheiri lost their lives defending their rights; 96 were injured and more than 300 were arrested.

Via Richard Reilly

(via decolonizehistory)